Summer Institute 2011: Culture, Sex, and Pleasure

The 10th annual Summer Institute explored the concepts of culture, sex, and pleasure through a critical analysis of race, gender, sexuality, age, disability and religion. Participants will have the option of enrolling in either a two-week or four-week intensive program.This year featured preeminent sexuality scholars whose work challenges conventional paradigms around sexuality and pleasure, critically examining the intersections of race, gender, class, and culture.Check out more about each faculty member or featured speaker below!

Juan Battle, PhD, Featured Speaker

Juan Battle is a Professor of SociologyPublic Health, & Urban Education at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (C.U.N.Y.). With over 50 grants and publications – including articles, encyclopedia entries, book chapters, and books – his research focuses on race, sexuality, and social justice. Professor Battle’s scholarship has included work throughout North America, as well as on South America, Africa, Asia, and Europe. Among his projects, currently he is heading the Social Justice Sexuality initiative – a project exploring the lived experiences of Black, Latina/o, and Asian lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people in the United States and Puerto Rico. He is a recent Fulbright Senior Specialist and was the Fulbright Distinguished Chair of Gender Studies at the University of Klagenfurt, Austria. Further, he is a former president of the Association of Black Sociologists and is actively involved with the American Sociological Association (ASA). He received his A.S. and B.S. from York College of Pennsylvania.  His M.A. and PhD were both received from the University of Michigan.

 

Charlie Glickman, PhD, Faculty

Dr. Charlie Glickman is the Education Program Manager at Good Vibrations in San Francisco. He received his doctorate in Adult Sexuality Education from the Union Institute and University and is certified as a sexuality educator by the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors, and Therapists. He has taught classes on a wide range of topics including sex-positivity, sex & shame, male gender socialization, principles and practices of effective adult education, and many sexual practices. He has also taught courses for therapists at JFK University and the California Institute of Integral Studies, and classes for seminary students at the Graduate Theological Union. You can learn more about him at www.charlieglickman.com.

 Trevor Hoppe, Featured Speaker

Trevor Hoppe is a graduate student in the joint PhD program in Sociology & Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. His ongoing dissertation research examines the application of the Michigan HIV disclosure law, which requires that HIV-positive people first disclose their HIV-status to their partners before having sex. His article examining gay men’s bottom identities, “Circuits of Power, Circuits of Pleasure: Sexual Scripting in Gay Men’s Bottom Narratives” is currently in press in the journal Sexualities. He holds a Master’s Degree in Sexuality Studies from San Francisco State University, and is presently completing a Master’s Degree in Public Health while obtaining his PhD at Michigan. His essays on sexuality, HIV, and gay men’s health have been published in numerous publications, including the anthology he edited, Beyond Masculinity: Essays by Queer Men on Gender & Politics, which can be read online in its entirety, free of cost.

 

Martin Manalansan, PhD, Featured Speaker

Martin F. Manalansan IV is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Asian American Studies and Conrad Professorial Humanities Scholar at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is an affiliate faculty in the Gender and Women’s Studies Program, the Global Studies Program and the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory. He is the author of Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora (Duke University Press,2003; Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2006) which was awarded the Ruth Benedict Prize in 2003. He is editor/co-editor of two anthologies namely, Cultural Compass: Ethnographic Explorations of Asian America (Temple University Press, 2000) and Queer Globalizations: Citizenship and the Afterlife of Colonialism (New York University Press, 2002) as well as a special issue of International Migration Review on gender and migration. Presently, he is Social Science Review Editor of GLQ: a journal of Gay and Lesbian Studies and is on the editorial board of the American Anthropologist, the flagship journal of the American Anthropological Association. His current book projects include contemporary LGBT cultural politics, Asian American immigrant culinary cultures, sensory and affective dimensions of race and difference, and Filipino return migration.

Samihta Mukhopadhyay, Faculty

Samhita Mukhopadhyay is the Executive Editor of Feministing.com and has been writing and speaking on race, media, technology and gender for over 6 years. She has written for multiple media outlets, including New American MediaWiretapColorlines, The Nation and The American Prospect. She has also been featured in India Currents Magazine, Nirali Magazine and Alternet. In 2007 she was named a Champion of Sexual Literacy by the National Sexuality Resource Center. She is currently writing a book for Seal Press about the dating and romance industry titled, Outdated: Why Dating is Ruining Your Love Life. Mukhopadhyay has been featured on multiple panels and keynoted conferences including South by South West Interactive, Allied Media ConferenceNational Conference on Media ReformWomen, Action and Media and CALCASA discussing gender, racesexuality and the internet.

Sonny Nordmarken, Featured Speaker

Sonny Nordmarken, a doctoral student in sociology at University of Massachusetts-Amherst, works on emotions, gender, sexuality, race, disability, performance, media, and embodiment. He is currently working on two projects. One explores the ways in which affect and discourse are mutually-constitutive, using queer theory to investigate how racism and ableism persist in the contemporary U.S. emotive imaginary. His dissertation examines the relationship between emotion and oppression, focusing on the emotional experiences of trans and gender variant people in everyday social interactions.

 

Ray O’Neill, MA, MSc, MPhil, Faculty

Ray O’ Neill M.A., M.Sc., M.Phil. GradDipPschAn is a writer and Lacanian psychoanalyst working in private practice in Dublin and Berlin. He is currently engaged in doctoral research on  how gay men blind since birth speak of their sexuality, coming out and  desire. He has also written extensively on homophobia in analytic practice, sexual abuse in Ireland and homosexualities.

Marcia Ochoa, PhD, Faculty

Marcia Ochoa is an Assistant Professor of Community Studies at UC Santa Cruz. Trained as a cultural anthropologist, Ochoa works at the conjuncture of the ethnography of media, modernity in Latin America and queer/transgender studies. Her first book is a queer diasporic ethnography of femininity, spectacle and nation in Venezuela. Queen for a Day:Transformistas, Misses and Mass Media in Venezuela, will be published by Duke University Press. She supervises El/La Para Translatinas, a justice, human rights and HIV prevention program for transgender Latinas in San Francisco’s Mission District. Her second project is on translatina and transformista citizenship.

 

Don Romesburg, PhD, Faculty

Don Romesburg is an assistant professor in the Sonoma State University Women’s and Gender Studies Department and the founder of the SSU Queer Studies Minor. Trained as a historian at UC Berkeley with interdisciplinary gender/sexuality studies emphases, he has published on early 20th-century U.S. social science, cultures, and discourses of adolescence, homosexuality, and citizenship as well as on the social and cultural history of queer and transgender performers. Don curates exhibitions for the GLBT History Museum in San Francisco.

 

Amy Schalet, PhD, Featured Speaker

Amy Schalet is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley and a Bachelor’s degree in Social Studies from Harvard University. Dr. Schalet’s research has focused on sexuality and culture and she has authored several publications on comparative adolescent sexuality. Her book, Not Under My Roof: Parents, Teens, and the Culture of Sex, to be published by the University of Chicago Press, examines approaches to adolescent sexuality in American and Dutch families. Prior to coming to the University of Massachusetts, Dr. Schalet held a three-year postdoctoral fellowship at the School of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, where she pursued the public health and policy implications of her research on adolescent sexual health. Dr. Schalet has given plenary addresses at sexual and reproductive health conferences, including the CDC Conference on STD-Prevention. She was recently awarded a grant by the Ford Foundation entitled, “Advancing Sexuality Education, Health and Policy Using a New ABCD for Adolescent Sexuality” which will expand previous work with physicians to educators, administrators, and school-based nurses.

 

Bethany Stevens, JD, MA, Featured Speaker

Bethany Stevens is a faculty member and policy analyst for the Center for Leadership in Disability in the Institute of Public Health at Georgia State University. She develops and implements graduate coursework in disability policy and disparities in sexual health, as well as undergraduate coursework in disability studies. Before joining the faculty at Georgia State University, Stevens served as a Center of Excellence for Sexual Health Scholar under 16th Surgeon General Dr. David Satcher at Morehouse School of Medicine. She earned a B.A. in Art History and a J.D. at the University of Florida. She earned a M.A. in Sexuality Studies at San Francisco State University. Stevens is a member of the California Bar Association. Working in the realm of disability activism and scholarship for nearly a decade, Stevens emphatically identifies as an uppity queer crip.

 

Patrick Wilson, PhD, Featured Speaker

Patrick Wilson, PhD, focuses on research related to HIV risk and prevention, ethnicity, and sexuality among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. Dr. Wilson’s work falls into three broad topic areas including the intersecting roles that psychological factors (i.e., self-concept, identity, self-efficacy) and socio-contextual factors (i.e., social networks, discrimination and stigma, religion, trauma) play in explaining HIV risk and protective behaviors among ethnic minority MSM; the situational factors that may promote or prevent sexual risk-taking, substance use, and poor mental health among MSM; and the development, implementation, evaluation, and translation of primary and secondary HIV prevention interventions targeting youth and MSM. Cutting across these topical areas is his use of innovative and rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies to answer research questions of interest. Dr. Wilson’s research is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

Click here to download Summer Institute Schedule at a Glance 2011.doc (63.5 KB)